Two decades of living and still pushing. History major first, middle-distance runner second, and all-around geek full-time.

Feel free to browse and enjoy motivational posts, short history pieces, and nerd-out awesomeness.

8th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Once Upon a Time in War with 57 notes

demons:

A French 220 Trench Mortar in action, c. 1917

demons:

A French 220 Trench Mortar in action, c. 1917

Tagged: historyworld war 1

8th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from web goodies and real life candies with 356 notes

alex-aki-art:

19th century realism. Germany.

1 - Caspar David Friedrich, “Monastery Graveyard in the Snow”

2 - Caspar David Friedrich, “Eldena”

3 - Caspar David Friedrich, “Graveyard”

4 - Carl Friedrich Lessing, “Castle”

5 - Carl Friedrich Lessing, “Klosterhof im Schnee”

6 - Carl Friedrich Lessing, “The Return of the Crusader”

Tagged: arthistory

Source: alex-aki-art

28th March 2014

Post reblogged from Photograpia with 27 notes

Stories

photograpia:

I was five years old when I first wanted to become a doctor.

Stretched out on a small examination table in a clinic in the Philippine Heart Center, I recall a nurse squeezing out a dollop of cold sticky gel right above my heart and rolling what looked like a small microphone in that area. “See Migi, it’s not so scary!” I said, turning to my brother for whom the 2-D echo was really intended. 

A few minutes later, the doctor would perform the same diagnostic test on Migi. That afternoon, he turned to me and said, “Do you want to try?” and I eagerly ran up the stepping stool to take a turn. He taught me how to use the small microphone, rolling it gently across my brother’s small frame. In a world where I was my parent’s “little helper” when it came to dealing with Migi’s Tetralogy of Fallot, that moment was the first in which I felt like I was actually close to truly understanding what was wrong with my baby brother’s heart. 

Migi passed away three years later due to complications during open-heart surgery. Often people have asked me if I wanted to become a doctor because my brother died. On the contrary, I tell them, I am becoming a doctor because my brother lived. I am becoming a doctor because I know everyday, somewhere in this country, there is a little boy or girl born with special needs, and I would give anything in the world to ensure that they can spend an entire lifetime with their families.

Growing up, except for a brief phase in which I wanted to become a talk show host like Sharon Cuneta, I knew that there was nothing I wanted to do more than become a doctor. As a child, my two favorite things to do were read and help out with the Migi’s Corner Foundation. My parents established the foundation-which put up play corners in government hospitals for confined children and their families- a year after his passing. My job entailed choosing the right toys and books for the needs of particular hospitals. This continued exposure became a motivational force when I was growing up. Until the time I found out that I would be entering Ateneo’s Health Sciences program, I never thought I would think twice about this dream.

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Tagged: history

24th March 2014

Photo reblogged from Soldaten im Einsatz with 17 notes

fallschirmjager:

Panzer IV Ausf.H of the 11./Pz.Rgt.16, 116 Panzer Div. was knocked out near the castle of Bourg St. Leondard, France during August 1944. Note the full Schurzen armored skirt and Zimmerit coating.An explosion inside the tank has blown off the driver’s and radio operator’s hatches. The horseshoe on the turret skirt seems to have brought this crew little luck.

fallschirmjager:

Panzer IV Ausf.H of the 11./Pz.Rgt.16, 116 Panzer Div. was knocked out near the castle of Bourg St. Leondard, France during August 1944. Note the full Schurzen armored skirt and Zimmerit coating.
An explosion inside the tank has blown off the driver’s and radio operator’s hatches. The horseshoe on the turret skirt seems to have brought this crew little luck.

Tagged: historyworld war 2

24th March 2014

Photo reblogged from Soldaten im Einsatz with 7 notes

fallschirmjager:

Tiger II Post Parting Shot…This Tiger II (which was was in much better condition when posted here), was one of the last Henschel produced and operated under 3./s.H.Pz.Abt.511. As it is obviously seen here, the running gear has been taken off and the big cat has been pushed off the side of the road.

fallschirmjager:

Tiger II Post Parting Shot…
This Tiger II (which was was in much better condition when posted here), was one of the last Henschel produced and operated under 3./s.H.Pz.Abt.511. As it is obviously seen here, the running gear has been taken off and the big cat has been pushed off the side of the road.

Tagged: historyworld war 2

23rd March 2014

Photo reblogged from Soldaten im Einsatz with 11 notes

fallschirmjager:

Tiger II ‘223’ was abandoned just outside of La Gleize on December 19th, 1944. This Tiger has no coat of Zimmerit which was no longer applied to AFVs after September 9th. This indicates that it was manufactured between early September and the beginning of October 1944.After the recapture of LA Gleize the American 1st US Army organized a tour for some press corps photographers during which these photos were taken. It is almost certain that the GI’s we can see in the photos are from the escort provided to the press corps and that they have set fire to the Tiger II to provide some “interest” for their guests.

fallschirmjager:

Tiger II ‘223’ was abandoned just outside of La Gleize on December 19th, 1944.
This Tiger has no coat of Zimmerit which was no longer applied to AFVs after September 9th. This indicates that it was manufactured between early September and the beginning of October 1944.
After the recapture of LA Gleize the American 1st US Army organized a tour for some press corps photographers during which these photos were taken. It is almost certain that the GI’s we can see in the photos are from the escort provided to the press corps and that they have set fire to the Tiger II to provide some “interest” for their guests.

Tagged: historyworld war 2

23rd March 2014

Photo reblogged from Soldaten im Einsatz with 5 notes

fallschirmjager:

This Panzer IV Ausf.C belonging to Pz.Rgt.2 was not only hit 3 times with a French 25mm Hotchkiss, but the MG also took a glancing hit and bent the barrel!

fallschirmjager:

This Panzer IV Ausf.C belonging to Pz.Rgt.2 was not only hit 3 times with a French 25mm Hotchkiss, but the MG also took a glancing hit and bent the barrel!

Tagged: history

23rd March 2014

Photo reblogged from Soldaten im Einsatz with 14 notes

fallschirmjager:

A rare picture of Tiger II ‘133’ operating under 1 Kompanie/schwere SS-Panzer Abteilung 101.Until recently there was no information about the whereabouts of the 3rd Platoon 1./s.SS-Pz.Abt.101 in Northern France.This rare picture of Tiger ‘133’ was made by Technical Sgt. Harold C. Satter of the 837th Ordnance Combat Depot Company. According to the handwritten notes on the back of the photograph, it was taken near Troyes.

fallschirmjager:

A rare picture of Tiger II ‘133’ operating under 1 Kompanie/schwere SS-Panzer Abteilung 101.Until recently there was no information about the whereabouts of the 3rd Platoon 1./s.SS-Pz.Abt.101 in Northern France.
This rare picture of Tiger ‘133’ was made by Technical Sgt. Harold C. Satter of the 837th Ordnance Combat Depot Company. According to the handwritten notes on the back of the photograph, it was taken near Troyes.

Tagged: historyworld war 2

23rd March 2014

Photo reblogged from Soldaten im Einsatz with 8 notes

fallschirmjager:

Panzertruppen of the Pz.Rgt.6/3 Pz.Div. have found a novel use for their Pz.Kpfw. Ausf.C, circa 1939.Of note here is the rhomboid with the tactical numbers on the side of the superstructure and the rear of the vehicle along with the plain white Balkenkreuz with no black outline.

fallschirmjager:

Panzertruppen of the Pz.Rgt.6/3 Pz.Div. have found a novel use for their Pz.Kpfw. Ausf.C, circa 1939.
Of note here is the rhomboid with the tactical numbers on the side of the superstructure and the rear of the vehicle along with the plain white Balkenkreuz with no black outline.

Tagged: history

22nd March 2014

Photo reblogged from 18th Century Love with 322 notes

myimaginarybrooklyn:

London, 1700.

myimaginarybrooklyn:

London, 1700.

Tagged: history

Source: ebay.co.uk

3rd January 2014

Photoset reblogged from awaken this sleeping night with 334,863 notes

fandom-deluxe:

fwips:

solograyson:

fishtwigz:

History according to Tumblr.

AH FWIPS I SEEE YOU

the life the legacy 

they really wanted his armies to be tall

Tagged: historyfunnytumblr

Source: fishtwigz

1st January 2014

Photo reblogged from Once Upon a Time in War with 83 notes

demons:

A British tank driver peering out of his Grant tank, North Africa 1942

demons:

A British tank driver peering out of his Grant tank, North Africa 1942

Tagged: historyworld war 2

31st December 2013

Photo reblogged from All Day, Everyday with 1,508 notes

bag-of-dirt:

A young Filipino Resistance fighter poses with a flag of the United States Army Forces in the Far East following the routing of Japanese occupying forces from her province. From 20 January 1945 to 15 August 1945, Tarlac was recaptured piece by piece by combined Filipino and American troops together with the recognized Filipino guerrilla fighters against the Japanese Imperial forces. Tarlac, Tarlac Province, Central Luzon, Philippines. August 1945. 

A bit saddened by the word ‘recognized’ because it hearkens to the unrecognized guerrilla forces, the Hukbalahap in particular, who bled just as much, and sometimes sacrificed even more, in defense of the country against the Japanese. That sad bit of history is also directly connected to the anti-Communist purges post-war, and the still on-going hostilities with rebel forces throughout Luzon.
All this simply because the peasants in the farmland were not protected, their voices in government hunted down, and the malignant status quo preserved.

bag-of-dirt:

A young Filipino Resistance fighter poses with a flag of the United States Army Forces in the Far East following the routing of Japanese occupying forces from her province. From 20 January 1945 to 15 August 1945, Tarlac was recaptured piece by piece by combined Filipino and American troops together with the recognized Filipino guerrilla fighters against the Japanese Imperial forces. Tarlac, Tarlac Province, Central Luzon, Philippines. August 1945. 

A bit saddened by the word ‘recognized’ because it hearkens to the unrecognized guerrilla forces, the Hukbalahap in particular, who bled just as much, and sometimes sacrificed even more, in defense of the country against the Japanese. That sad bit of history is also directly connected to the anti-Communist purges post-war, and the still on-going hostilities with rebel forces throughout Luzon.

All this simply because the peasants in the farmland were not protected, their voices in government hunted down, and the malignant status quo preserved.

Tagged: historyphilippines

Source: bag-of-dirt

30th December 2013

Post reblogged from lol my thesis with 7 notes

There was this Hittite king who might or might not have had a son, but definitely moved his seat of government from one place to another, and then his brother moved it back, and all 8 people who care are like “Why’d he do that? Tevs.”.

lolmythesis:

Cuneiform Studies, University of Chicago

Tagged: thesisfunnyhistory

30th December 2013

Quote reblogged from I Write As I Write with 11 notes

I cannot refrain from expressing to you a certain melancholy upon thinking that this new being in whose veins Filipino blood runs and who will be educated with so much care will afterwards be a lost member for a country that is in need of men. I have the same sentiment when I hold in my arms the {French born} son of {Juan} Luna and Pacita Pardo {de Tavera} - he is one French and one Filipino less…The only thing you can do is to educate well your child and inculcate in him noble and honorable sentiments so that one day, if good luck sends him to the Philippines, he may not be one of so many who exploit the ignorance of the unfortunate, and be one more tyrant to the brothers of his father.

All honorable men of the world are compatriots.

— Jose Rizal to Fernando Canon, 2 May 1889 (via iwriteasiwrite)

Tagged: jose rizalhistoryphilippines